Podcast


Think back.  What’s the best idea you ever had?

Hear Us Roar: Interviews with women's fiction writersMine definitely came in early 2018 when I hatched the idea of doing a podcast where I’d interview first-time authors about not only their book but also their path to publication, As a long-time member of the Women’s Fiction Writers Association (WFWA), I decided this would be the perfect venue for showcasing my fellow members when they published their debut novel and approached the board with the idea.

A triple win:  Enhance the reputation and value of this great organization; give publicity to members as they launched their career; and increase my own visibility in the writing community.

Please take a few minutes to listen to a few of my 30-minute interviews with a growing roster of WFWA members as they share their stories.


Linda Rosen

Linda Rosen

Linda talks about her experiences working with a small press, her quirky habit of “collecting” bookstores, and how one chance remark on a beach sparked the idea for her novel.

read more
Michelle Davis

Michelle Davis

Listen to my podcast with Michelle Davis (Learning to Bend, Self-published, 2020).  Hear how two Amys inspired her to begin writing, how her weekly blog frees up her creative juices, and the story behind her book trailer.

read more
Kimmery Martin

Kimmery Martin

This podcast episode features Kimmery Martin (The Queen of Hearts, Berkley/Penguin, 2018). A practicing cardiologist when she wrote this first novel, Kimmery went through 100 rejections before...

read more
Sarah Robinson

Sarah Robinson

Sarah is a prolific writer of romance novels  (22 books and counting) but this is her first work in the women’s fiction genre. Find out what inspired her story of a young woman fighting to die with dignity, one early readers have compared to This Is Us.

Jennifer Gold

Jennifer Gold

Find out why Jennifer is using a pen name for her women’s fiction, how she found her agent through very unconventional means, and how she thinks it’s a mistake for authors to typecast themselves into one mode of writing. 

Lorelei Brush

Lorelei Brush

Lorelei spent two years in Pakistan as part of a US funded project to train local teachers (even receiving a death threat from the Taliban), then turned her observations into a novel centered on an articulate, educated woman living in a culture vastly different than our own.